Caring for a Male External Urinary Collecting System

PostCare™

Caring for a Male External Urinary Collecting System

Regular price $99.99 Sale price $69.99
390

What's the Procedure for Caring for a Male External Urinary Collecting System?

When a man is unable to control his urine for long periods of time he is said to be incontinent. To avoid soiling his clothes and bed a condom-style sheath can be used to connect the penis to a closed drainage system in which the urine is collected. This avoids having a catheter inserted into the man's urinary bladder and greatly decreases the risk of bladder infections. The complete urine collecting system consists of: * The condom style sheath on the penis * The plastic drainage tube which is coiled on and attached to the bed to avoid tension on the sheath * The urine collection bag which is attached to the bed frame below the level of the man's bladder. When taking care of this male external urine collecting system, the responsibilities of the caregiver are to: * Replace the condom sheath every 24 hours * Wash and dry the penis * Inspect the skin of the penis for soreness * Report any problems to your doctor The equipment that you will need to assemble before starting the care task includes: * Disposable bed protector * Gauze squares * Basin containing warm, soapy water * Condom external catheter * Can of adhesive spray * Clean washcloth * Two clean towels, one for your hands and one for the penis * Piece of material and a safety pin * Plastic storage bag, gallon size and * Disposable gloves Wash your hands for at least 10 seconds. Completely dry them using one of the clean towels. Put on your disposable gloves. Place the bed protector under the thighs. Disconnect the drainage tube from the end of the condom sheath. Hold it up to allow any urine in it to drain back into the collection bag. Cover the end of the tube with a gauze square and place the covered end on the bed protector away from where you are working. Remove the condom by rolling it down to the tip of the penis. Place the condom in the plastic storage bag. Fold the clean washcloth around your hand. Wet it thoroughly in the warm soapy water. Hold the head of the penis up and gently wash the shaft and head of the penis. Drop the washcloth into the warm water. Use the clean towel to carefully and completely dry the penis. Ask the man if he feels any soreness and carefully inspect the penis for redness or soreness. Any problem should be noted and reported to your doctor. Apply a thin spray of adhesive to the whole penis except for the head. Apply the condom to the end of the penis and roll it down to the base of the penis. C heck that the condom is secure at the base. Gently pull on the end of the condom to make sure it is securely attached to the penis and attach it to the drainage tube. The connected condom sheath should look like this. Remove the bed protector. Fold it tight and place it in the plastic storage bag. Coil the drainage tube on the bed and secure it with a piece of material and a safety pin. Remove your gloves and place them in the plastic storage bag and seal the bag. * Drop the plastic storage bag into a thick garbage bag. It can be disposed of in the normal trash. * Thoroughly wash your hands. * Wash the used towels and washcloth in the normal laundry system. In a small notebook, document: * the date and time * that the condom sheath has been replaced * and any observations about the man's penis or his general condition. With your understanding of the causes of a low blood glucose, it is clear that the best prevention of this problem is to be consistent with your daily plans for medications, food, exercise and monitoring and drink alcohol wisely. No more than one to two drinks per day. Symptoms of mild hypoglycemia that you may feel are: shakiness, palpitations, hunger, sweating and headache. Symptoms of moderate hypoglycemia are headache, dizziness, decreased concentration, mood changes and drowsiness. If the earlier symptoms of hypoglycemia are not recognized, the patient can go on to have seizures, loss of consciousness and progress into coma. If you suspect that your blood sugar is low, immediately check your blood glucose. If this confirms hypoglycemia, a reading of 70 milligrams per deciliter or below, or if testing is not available, follow the "Rule of 15" program. Immediately eat or drink 15 grams of rapidly absorbed carbohydrate. This can be either half a cup of fruit juice or non diet soda, or a cup of milk, or 4 or five pieces of hard candy, or 3 packets or 1 tablespoon of sugar, or 3 glucose tablets. Recheck your blood glucose reading after 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, if your blood sugar is still below 70 mg/dl, repeat the treatment of 15 grams of carbohydrate. Recheck your blood sugar after another 15 minutes. When your blood sugar reaches more than 70 mg/dl, have your regular meal, or if this is not available, have a snack of complex carbohydrate and protein, for example peanut butter crackers, to provide 30 grams of carbohydrate. If the patient is having seizures or is unconscious, always call 911 so at the patient can be taken to an emergency department. When you have had an episode of hypoglycemia, analyze why it happened and discuss with your nurse or doctor your insulin dosages, the timing of your meals, your physical activity, use of alcohol and the frequency with which you need to monitor your blood glucose. High blood sugar-hyperglycemia- is present when your blood sugar is above 250 milligrams per deciliter. Hyperglycemia can occur when you have missed a dose of insulin or pills or have not taken enough; if you have gone off your recommended diet and indulged too freely; or if you have an illness or infection; or excessive stress. There may be no symptoms and signs of hyperglycemia or they can include: weakness and fatigue, thirst, and frequent urination. When you notice any of these symptoms, check your blood glucose. If the blood glucose is above 250 milligram per deciliter, you will need to adjust your diet, medication and exercise program. Hyperglycemia happens to everyone with diabetes at some time. Even if you feel well, but your blood sugar is consistently high, it needs attention to prevent long-term complications. You should consult your medical team. If your blood sugar stays over 250 milligram per deciliter, you can progress into diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly if you have Type 1 diabetes. The symptoms and signs of this are: excessive urination and thirst; nausea and vomiting; fruity breath and ketones in your urine Treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is to call your doctor or nurse or go to the emergency room immediately. It is important to develop a sick day plan before you get sick. If you have symptoms such as fever, cough, head congestion, nausea or vomiting, do not stop taking your diabetes medications. Test and record your blood glucose every two hours. If you cannot eat your usual meal plan, try to take 15 grams of carbohydrate every 1-2 hours while awake. Foods which contain 15 grams of carbohydrates include: *1 cup chicken soup, *1/2 cup fruit juice, *1/2 cup ginger ale or Coke (not diet), *1/2 cup regular Jell- O, *1/2 cup vanilla ice cream, *1/2 cup cooked cereal. Check in with your doctor or nurse if: *you have vomiting or diarrhea for more than 6 hours; *if your illness is not improving after 2 days; *if your blood glucose stays above 240 milligrams per deciliter; *if you are not sure what to do.